Atlantis Arisen
July 01, 2022, 02:30:13 pm
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: Chinese farmers grew rice 7,700 years ago
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21096855/
 
  Home Help Search Arcade Links Staff List Login Register  
  Show Posts
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 17
1  Writing / Poetry / New Poems of Greek Poetess Sappho Recovered on: February 01, 2014, 10:33:50 pm
New Poems of Greek Poetess Sappho Recovered
By Konstantinos Menzel on January 28, 2014 in Archaeology, History, news, United Kingdom

Greek Sappho papyrusToday, only few poems by the ancient Greek poetess Sappho have survived, but thanks to new findings, two new works have been recovered, giving experts hope to find even more.

These previously unknown poems by the great poetess of the 7th century B.C. came to light when the owner of an ancient papyrus consulted Oxford classicist world-renowned papyrologist Dr. Dirk Obbink about the Greek writings on the tattered scrap.

Despite Sappho’s fame in antiquity and huge literary output, only one complete poem survives until today, along with substantial portions of four others. One of those four was only recovered in 2004, also from a scrap of papyrus.

“The new Sappho is the best preserved Sappho papyrus in existence, with just a few letters that had to be restored in the first poem, and not a single word that is in doubt. Its content is equally exciting,” said a Harvard classics professor upon examining the papyrus.

One of the two recovered poems speaks of a Charaxos and a Larichos, the names assigned by ancient Greeks to two of Sappho’s brothers, though never before found in Sappho’s own writings. The poem is set to cause discussions about whether or not the two men are Sappho’s brothers. It depicts an exchange between two people concerned about the success of Charaxos’ latest sea voyage. The speaker may be Sappho herself, but the loss of the poem’s initial lines makes this unclear.

A horizontal line on the papyrus indicates the end of the first poem and the beginning of the next, an address to the goddess Aphrodite. Only scattered words from this second poem can be recovered from the papyrus, which grows more tattered and illegible to the end.

The two poems share a common meter, the so-called Sapphic stanza, a verse form perhaps devised by Sappho and today bearing her name. Both belonged, therefore, to the first of Sappho’s nine books of poetry and their recovery gives a clearer glimpse into the makeup and structure of that book. “All the poems of Sappho’s first book seem to have been about family, biography, and cult, together with poems about love/Aphrodite,” Dr. Obbink writes.

Sappho wrote in a dialect of Greek called Aeolic, which is significantly different in sound and spellings than the Attic Greek that later became standard. The handwriting on the papyrus allowed Dr. Obbink to establish its date as late 2nd or 3rd century A.D., almost a millennium after Sappho first wrote. It was not long after this time that Aeolic texts and other non-standard dialects began to die out in ancient Greece, with the focus of educators and copyists shifting on Attic writers.

The new Sappho papyrus probably came from the Egyptian city of Oxyrynchus, home to a large Greek-speaking population in antiquity and the source of most of these papyri, “since in its dry climate even plant-based materials can survive intact,” explains Dr. Obbink, also head of Oxford University’s Oxyrynchus Papyrus Project.

ancient Greek manuscripts, Dr. Dirk Obbink, Europe, Greece news, Greek literature, greek news, Oxford University, poetess Sappho
- See more at: http://eu.greekreporter.com/2014/01/28/new-poems-of-greek-poetess-sappho-recovered/#sthash.esY8miDJ.dpuf
2  Mesoamerican Cultures / Olmec / Examination of Olmec offering from La Venta on: February 01, 2014, 10:30:10 pm

 
Examination of Olmec offering from La Venta

Article created on Tuesday, January 28, 2014
Print

The present-day Mexican State of Tabasco houses the great Olmec city of La Venta which existed from around 1000 to 400 B.C. Archaeologists have found many fabulous offerings buried within the site – such La Venta 4 – which is composed of 16 different figurines carved out of various stones, representing male individuals accompanied by six celts.

The offering was located on the north platform of La Venta in 1955 by Eduardo Contreras (INAH), and for half a century the group was housed at the Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution and returned to Mexico in 2011. Since then it has been exhibited at the National Museum of Anthropology (MNA).
The offering was located on the North platform of La Venta in 1955. Image: INAH

The offering was located on the North platform of La Venta in 1955. Image: INAH
Layers of clay

The offering was carefully buried under layers of  various coloured clay. The first layer was a coffee colour, followed by orange, pink, yellow and white, and possibly may refer to different levels of the cosmos. The figurines themselves all exhibit elongated skulls and slanted eyes without pupils. This is in contrast to the famous colossal Olmec heads which show no cranial deformation and have eyes with pupils.

Recent mineral analysis, as part of a more detailed study of La Venta 4, confirmed that the ancient Olmec civilization had a wide territorial and commercial reach, maintaining contact with Guatemala, Guerrero and Oaxaca.




Examining the physical evidence

The analysis was carried out ​​in conjunction with the Institute of Physics of the National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM ), with support from Dr. Jose Luis Ruvalcaba. As a result it was possible to identify the type and varous sources of the green stones that the figurines were carved from.
The Offering 4 at La Venta was found in 1955. Image: INAH

The Offering 4 at La Venta was found in 1955. Image: INAH
Mineral deposit map

The 22 elements were analyzed with stereoscopic microscopy, Raman spectrometry and Infrared, with X-ray diffraction, so that the  various types could be established: jadeitita, pyroxenite, plagiogranito, serpentinite and rock zoisite, chlorite, cordierite and chromite. These studies were matched to a mineral deposit map of Mesoamerica to identify probable locatons. It is the first time that the physical evidence of the Olmec territorial expanse has been examined and it was found that the green stones came from the Motagua River in Guatemala, and streams in Guerrero and Oaxaca and may be evidence of trading alliances with these locations.

Source: INAH
More Information
   

    La Venta – Smithsonian

Cite this article

INAH. Examination of Olmec offering from La Venta. Past Horizons. January 28, 2014, from http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/01/2014/examination-olmec-offering-la-venta

For Archaeology News – Archaeology Research – Archaeology Press Releases
You may also like -
Colossal Masterworks of Ancient Mexico at the de YoungColossal Masterworks of Ancient Mexico at the de YoungPottery grave goods tell us about lifePottery grave goods tell us about lifeFracture treatment in Iron Age and Roman BritainFracture treatment in Iron Age and Roman BritainOlmec sculpture uncovered in MexicoOlmec sculpture uncovered in MexicoManufacture, wear and repair of the Chiseldon Iron Age cauldronsManufacture, wear and repair of the Chiseldon Iron Age cauldrons
Comment on Article with Facebook

Filed under Featured, News · Tagged with Archaeology, Mexico, Olmec, Tabasco

Posted by Past Horizons on Tuesday, January 28, 2014 · Leave a Comment

Comments are closed.

 

Archaeology Equipment Store

 

Fieldschool Project Database

 

Archaeology films and videos

 
Latest Posts

    Monte Pando (Cantabria), archaeological site of caves Myron and El Horno. / Manuel R. González MoralesHunter gatherers gradually moved down-slope

    Scientists have traced the steps of the human beings that inhabited the Cantabrian coast during the Palaeolithic era
    A drowned land – 11,000 year old settlement of Hanö Bay

    Inundated areas ofd the coast of Southern Sweden reveal a remarkable opportunity to explore a well preserved Mesolithic landscape
    La Venta 4 figurines with Great Pyramid in the background. Images: INAHExamination of Olmec offering from La Venta

    Recent mineral analysis, as part of a more detailed study of La Venta Offering 4, confirmed that the ancient Olmec civilization had a wide territorial and commercial reach
    Qesem Cave. Image: WikimediaEvidence for repeated fire use around 300,000 years ago

    Findings from Qesem Cave hint that its prehistoric inhabitants already had a highly advanced social structure and intellectual capacity
    Hieroglyphics in the tomb showing Senebkay's name. Photograph: Photograph: Egyptian ministry of antiquitiesArchaeologists find remains of previously unknown pharaoh in Egypt

    Discovery of 3,600-year-old body of King Senebkay confirms existence of forgotten dynasty

Archaeology Blogs

    Aardvarchaeology
    AlunSalt: Ancient Science
    Ancient Bodies, Ancient Lives
    Ancient Digger
    Ancient Wisdom
    ArchaeoBlog
    Archaeodeath
    Archaeology About
    ASOR
    Bad Archaeology
    Bones Don't Lie
    Digital Public Archaeology
    Doug's Archaeology
    Heritage of Wales News
    heritagelandscapecreativity
    john hawks weblog
    Megalithic Portal
    Mesolithic Miscellany
    microburin
    Middle Savagery
    My Cartoon version of reality
    Past Thinking
    Powered by Osteons
    Random Acts of Science
    Rogueclassicism
    Testimony of the Spade
    The Subversive Archaeologist
    These Bones of Mine
    Western Digs

 
Tag Cloud
Africa Anthropology Archaeology Article bajr Bronze Age Burial china Culture DNA Egypt Evolution excavation FRance Heritage History Iron-age Israel Italy Main section Maya megalithic Mexico museum neanderthal neolithic news News Palaeolithic past horizons Petrie Museum podcast prehistoric research Rock-art roman Science Scotland stone age stonepages The Guardian turkey UK news world World news
Academics Blog Directory
Contact and Privacy

You can contact us about any stories you may have or with general comment or queries about Past Horizons.

by post:

Old Schoolrooms,
Luggate Burn ,
Haddington,
EH 41 4QA ,
United Kingdom

or by phone:

01620 861643

or by email:

editor@pasthorizons.com

Past Horizons is run by Maggie Struckmeier and David Connolly who are archaeologists living in Scotland. We hope you enjoy what we do. We are happy to have any factual errors corrected as well as hear about your own projects or research.
Privacy and Cookies
We use cookies to help us offer you a rich experience in news and articles. To help us do this we need your consent to receive our cookies. To find out more about the policy, see our privacy policy. The orange pop up on the right is for you to opt in or out of cookie usage.
Hans Splinter Images of Archeon
Our Facebook Page

Copyright © 2014 · All Rights Reserved · Archaeology News from Past Horizons

Magazine Theme v3 by Organic Themes · WordPress Hosting · RSS Feed · Log in
Organic Themes

http://www.pasthorizonspr.com/index.php/archives/01/2014/examination-olmec-offering-la-venta
3  Science & Technology / Human Genetics / Blue-Eyed Hunter-Gatherers Roamed Prehistoric Europe, Gene Map Reveals on: February 01, 2014, 10:25:56 pm

Blue-Eyed Hunter-Gatherers Roamed Prehistoric Europe, Gene Map Reveals
Some ancient peoples in Spain 7,000 years ago had blue eyes and dark skin.
A drawing of a male-hunter gatherer.



An artistic impression of the blue-eyed male hunter-gatherer.

RENDERING BY CSIC

Dan Vergano

National Geographic

Published January 26, 2014

Apologies to Frank Sinatra, but the real Ol' Blue Eyes has been found—a 7,000-year-old Spaniard whose fossil genes reveal that early Europeans sported blue eyes and dark skin.

Mapping the blue-eyed boy's genes is part of ongoing effort to uncover the DNA of ancient humans. The new study in the journal Nature, led by Inigo Olalde of Spain's Institut de Biología Evolutiva in Barcelona, reports the genetic map of a skeleton found in a Spanish cave. (See also: "Modern Europe's Genetic History Starts in Stone Age.")

Why It Matters

Scholars had suspected that blue eyes arrived as an import into Europe, brought by late-arriving farmers who invaded the continent more than 5,000 years ago. Contrary to the conventional picture of a blue-eyed, fair-haired northern European, the study suggests that blue eyes were already common among the continent's early hunter-gatherers, along with darker skin.

But those aren't the only results that matter from the study. The researchers also discovered that a number of disease-resistance genes seen in modern Europeans were active in the ancient Spaniard's gene map. And the study adds genetic support to archaeological findings that hint that a widespread hunter-gatherer culture cut continuously across Europe in prehistory.

What They Did

The researchers extracted DNA from a tooth found with the skeleton of man, dubbed La Brana 1, uncovered in a cave near León, Spain, in 2006.

In the lab, they compared the DNA from the man with DNA from other Stone Age Europeans, such as Ötzi, the 5,300-year-old "Iceman" of the Alps (whose people were farmers), and older, partial samples of genes recovered from hunter-gatherer burials in Sweden, Finland, and Siberia.

They also compared the results against the DNA of 35 modern-day Europeans.

What They Found

Around 7,000 years ago, a Stone Age culture spread across Europe, made famous by discoveries of small, rotund "Venus" figurines found in their burials. The study results suggest those people were genetically connected—one thin population of dark-haired hunter-gatherers whose domain reached from Spain to Siberia. They were also partly the ancestors of many of today's northern Europeans.

Moreover, the ancient Spaniard had multiple genes linked to disease immunity, resistance to bacteria, and risks for musculoskeletal ailments, ones seen in people today. Understanding the origin of these genes can help better explain their function, which could aid medical studies, for example.

For fans of the "Paleo Diet" and other get-back-to-nature notions, the study brings some good news, suggesting that people carry around plenty of genes left over from their primeval forebears. The survival of some disease-resistance genes that mattered greatly in antiquity, as shown by their continuity in modern humans, also can help show how evolution worked its magic on us, and is still working today.

Follow Dan Vergano on Twitter


http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/01/140126-blue-eye-spain-fossil-human-discovery-gene/
4  Messages / Upcoming Events / Re: Time to Recall Scott Walker! on: November 16, 2011, 01:44:33 am
If you go to unitedwisconsin.com you’ll find a link to our online store. All the proceeds from the store help us continue our recall efforts. We’re completely non-profit.

http://store.unitedwisconsin.com/
5  Messages / Upcoming Events / Re: Time to Recall Scott Walker! on: November 16, 2011, 01:43:33 am
United Wisconsin Offices

Madison
1605 Monroe St
Madison, WI 53711
608-251-0532

Milwaukee
2604 N Booth St.
Milwaukee, WI 53212

 

Petition Offices

Appleton
612 W College Ave
Appleton, WI 54911
michaelp@wisdems.org

Beaver Dam
116 Monroe St
Beaver Dam WI 53916
jenniferb@wisdems.org

Burlington
616 Droster Ave.
Burlington, WI 53105
262-757-8662

Eau Claire
405 S Barstow
Eau Claire, WI 54701
collinh@wisdems.org

Elkhorn
10 S. Washington Street
Elkhorn, WI 53121

Fond du Lac
21 N Portland Street
Fond du lac, WI 54935
jenniferb@wisdems.org
(920) 216-1982

Green Bay
1061 W Mason
Green Bay, WI 54304
evank@wisdems.org
(920) 216-1887

Janesville
1795 Lafayette St
Janesville, WI 53546
stephm@wisdems.org
(608) 692-9173

Kenosha
5535 6th Avenue
Kenosha, 53410
timothyr@wisdems.org
scottp@wisdems.org

La Crosse
116 5th Avenue South
La Crosse, WI 54601
ericak@wisdems.org
laurah@wisdems.org
(608) 695-8973

Madison
6602 Normandy Lane
Madison, WI 53703
danerecallwest@wisdems.org
(608) 692-4573

330 E Wilson
Madison, WI 53703
danerecalleast@wisdems.org
(608) 692-9740

Manitowoc
1207 Washington Street
Manitowoc, WI 54220
jenniferb@wisdems.org

Menomonie
105 21st Street N
Menomonie, WI 54751
menomonie@wisdems.org

Milwaukee
7984 W Appleton Ave
Milwaukee, WI 53218
milwaukeenorth@wisdems.org
(414) 510-0453

3206-3208 W National
Milwaukee, WI 53215
milwaukeesouth@wisdems.org
(414) 491-7625
6807 N. Green Bay Ave
Milwaukee, WI

Marshfield
225 S. Central Ave.

Oshkosh
480 North Main St
Oshkosh, WI 54901
kyleb@wisdems.org

Portage
216 W Wisconsin
Portage, WI 53901
amandah@wisdems.org
(608) 698-5875

Racine
2100 Layard Ave
Racine, WI 53404
maxwellt@wisdems.org
bethp@wisdems.org
(262) 631-9719

Rhinelander
29 W Davenport St
Rhinelander, WI 54022
williamj@wisdems.org
(715) 369-3231

Richland Center
900 N Main St
Richland Center, 53581
sheighf@wisdems.org
(608) 698-5942

River Falls
1025 So. Main Unit 450
River Falls, WI 54022
matthewb@wisdems.org

Superior
1810 Belknap St.
Superior, WI 54880
kaeleenr@wisdems.org

Stevens Point
2220 Division Street
Stevens Point, WI 54481
jeffreyw@wisdems.org
(715) 817-6572

Sturgeon Bay
62 South 3rd Ave
Sturgeon Bay, WI 54235
jeremyc@wisdems.org
(920) 964-2727

Waukesha
312 W Broadway
Waukesha, WI 53186
evang@wisdems.org
(262) 631-9712

Wausau
4404 Stewart Ave
Wausau, WI 54401
samgl@wisdems.org

West Allis
1370 S 74th St., Suite 106
West Allies, WI 53214
milwaukeewest@wisdems.org
(414) 215-0167

Wisconsin Rapids
341 Oak St.
6  Messages / Upcoming Events / Time to Recall Scott Walker! on: November 16, 2011, 01:41:50 am
http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=IY2Qa74VGms#t=0s

Official United Wisconsin Recall Petitions are available here! Time to Recall Scott Walker!

http://grassroots.wisdems.org/page/s/united-wisconsin-petition-download

http://www.unitedwisconsin.com/
7  Messages / Causes & Activism / Re: Wisconsin Governor, Eyed In Corruption Probe After FBI Raid on: September 16, 2011, 04:55:23 pm
Former Walker aide shaken, embarrassed following FBI raid, denies any wrongdoing
Former Walker aide shaken, embarrassed following FBI raid, denies any wrongdoing
CLAY BARBOUR | cbarbour@madison.com | 608-252-6129 madison.com | (65) Comments | Posted: Friday, September 16, 2011 5:30 am
http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/50/e505cdc4-df07-11e0-96a9-001cc4c03286/4e7100a623269.image.jpg
http://pictopia.com/perl/ptp/madison?photo_name=ff2fabdc-dfef-11e0-805e-001cc4c03286&title=&t_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/50/e505cdc4-df07-11e0-96a9-001cc4c03286/4e7100a623269.image.jpg&fs_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/50/e505cdc4-df07-11e0-96a9-001cc4c03286/4e7100a963127.hires.jpg&pps=buynow http://pictopia.com/perl/ptp/madison?photo_name=ff2fabdc-dfef-11e0-805e-001cc4c03286&title=&t_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/50/e505cdc4-df07-11e0-96a9-001cc4c03286/4e7100a623269.image.jpg&fs_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/50/e505cdc4-df07-11e0-96a9-001cc4c03286/4e7100a963127.hires.jpg&pps=buynowDALE RIECHERS photo
An FBI agent searches an SUV parked in the driveway of Cynthia Archer, a former top aide to Gov. Scott Walker, on Wednesday morning.
 Loading…
An FBI agent searches an SUV parked in the driveway of Cynthia
Archer, a former top aide to Gov. Scott Walker, on Wednesday
morning.

" rel=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/50/e505cdc4-df07-11e0-96a9-001cc4c03286/4e7100a623269.image.jpg jQuery1316189771671="151" An FBI agent searches an SUV parked in the driveway of Cynthia
Archer, a former top aide to Gov. Scott Walker, on Wednesday
morning.

" rel=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/e/50/e505cdc4-df07-11e0-96a9-001cc4c03286/4e7100a623269.image.jpg jQuery1316189771671="151"
FBI agents searched this home owned by Cynthia Archer, a former
top aide to Gov. Scott Walker, on Wednesday morning.

" rel=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/9b/09bb89d8-defe-11e0-b338-001cc4c03286/4e70f01cb8bb5.image.jpg jQuery1316189771671="152" FBI agents searched this home owned by Cynthia Archer, a former
top aide to Gov. Scott Walker, on Wednesday morning.

" rel=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/0/9b/09bb89d8-defe-11e0-b338-001cc4c03286/4e70f01cb8bb5.image.jpg jQuery1316189771671="152"
Related Stories
Related: Officers, FBI agents search home of former Walker aide
Related: Top official in Walker administration takes leave
Political coverage on Twitter
Follow @MadPoliticsAll Wisconsin politics. All the time. For the junkie in us all.
More from this section
Unions lead in lobbying in first half of 2011
Justices decide against opening deliberations to public
Update: Police issue citation to man accused of pouring beer on legislator's head
New union certification rules take effect
Officers, FBI agents search home of former Walker aide
More...
Cynthia Archer spent the better part of Thursday working around her East Side home and assuring neighbors she's OK.
The quaint, tree-lined neighborhood was the scene of an all-out FBI raid Wednesday, when law enforcement officers arrived at Archer's home at 6:45 a.m. and began collecting evidence. They even took the hard drive from an old computer Archer sold to a neighbor over the summer.
It was exhausting and scary, and a full day later Archer seemed a little shaken and embarrassed, though she reiterated that she has done nothing wrong.
"I've lived here 20 years," she said, standing in her front yard. "I feel like I need to go around and apologize to my neighbors for the fuss; let them know I'm all right."
Archer, 52, a longtime aide to Gov. Scott Walker, is part of an investigation. That much is clear, but much else with this case remains a mystery. Archer said law enforcement has ordered her to not discuss the case, and officials with the FBI and the Milwaukee County district attorney's office are not saying anything either.
The information vacuum has led to a minor media frenzy, with reporters trying to figure out if this has anything to do with Walker.
Walker was out of state Thursday campaigning for Republicans in Kentucky, and spokesman Cullen Werwie said his office would have no comment on the raid or investigation. Former U.S. Attorney Steven Biskupic, whom Walker's campaign hired shortly after last year's election, did not return a message seeking comment.
The search of Archer's house comes amid a John Doe investigation in Milwaukee County, which started last year after another staff member working for then-Milwaukee County Executive Walker admitted to anonymously posting pro-Walker comments on political websites while on county time. Archer was director of administrative services for Walker while he was county executive.
She followed him to Madison to serve as the Department of Administration's deputy secretary. She left that post last month and went on medical leave for a "private health reason." When she returns, Archer said, she will work for the Department of Children and Families.
A John Doe investigation is a secret proceeding in which witnesses may be subpoenaed to testify. Participants are barred from discussing the case publicly.
As part of that investigation, authorities last year seized the work computer of the commenting employee, Darlene Wink, and searched her home. They also took another computer belonging to Tim Russell, then county housing director and a former Walker campaign staff member.
Wink's attorney, Chris Wiesmueller, said Thursday he had no idea whether she was connected to the raid on Archer's house.
"I'm really in the dark in how we get from Darlene to Cynthia Archer," Wiesmueller said.
Archer told the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel last week she was "not involved in any way in the John Doe investigation." Archer noted Thursday that she made those statements before Wednesday's raid. She would not elaborate, however.
"I'm not worried," Archer said. "I don't even have a lawyer. I don't need a lawyer. I did nothing inappropriate."
- The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Read more: http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_ff2fabdc-dfef-11e0-805e-001cc4c03286.html#ixzz1Y8Ij4gCe
8  Messages / Causes & Activism / Wisconsin Governor, Eyed In Corruption Probe After FBI Raid on: September 16, 2011, 04:54:46 pm
Scott Walker, Wisconsin Governor, Eyed In Corruption Probe After FBI Raid On Cynthia Archer's Home SCOTT BAUER and DINESH RAMDE 09/15/11 07:07 PM ET 
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/09/16/scott-walker-cynthia-archer-fbi-raid-wisconsin_n_965899.html?view=print&comm_ref=false


MADISON, Wis. — Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker kept his distance Thursday from an investigation into one of his top agency officials, staying silent despite calls from his opponents to say what he knows about why FBI agents raided her home a day earlier.
Agents raided the home of Cynthia Archer, who held a top spot in Walker's office when he served as Milwaukee County executive and followed Walker to work in state government after last November's election.
The raid comes amid an ongoing secret Milwaukee County investigation that the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, citing unnamed people familiar with the case, said focuses on whether county staffers in Walker's office did political work on the taxpayer dime.
This week's action is a reminder of long-simmering questions surrounding work by Walker's county staffers, one of whom admitted last year to anonymously posting pro-Walker comments on websites while on county time. It also raises questions about how deep the investigation will go and what implications it could have for the rising first-term Republican star.
Milwaukee County District Attorney John Chisholm declined Thursday to comment on the case. The Journal Sentinel reported that the secret proceeding allows witnesses to be subpoenaed and compelled to testify under oath, while forbidding them from talking publicly about the case.
Archer told The Associated Press on Thursday she never has done anything inappropriate and that Walker never asked her to do anything inappropriate. She also said she never was subpoenaed and nor told she was involved in the investigation.
Archer, 52, who is on paid sick leave from a her job as a legislative liaison with the Department of Children and Family Services, said she was woken early Wednesday by FBI agents knocking on the door of her Madison home. She said she didn't remember seeing a warrant and didn't ask them to produce one.
"They wouldn't need a warrant. If they need anything I'll give it to them," said Archer, adding she had no plans to hire an attorney because she had done nothing wrong.
Walker was out of state Thursday campaigning for Republicans in Kentucky and spokesman Cullen Werwie said his office would have no comment on the raid or investigation. Former U.S. Attorney Steven Biskupic, who Walker's campaign hired after receiving a subpoena for campaign emails shortly after last year's election, did not return a message seeking comment.
 
Democratic legislative leaders reacted to the raid Thursday by introducing a bill to repeal changes that allowed the governor to replace civil service positions in state agencies with political appointees. The changes were just one of many Walker-backed initiatives the Republican-led Legislature passed at breakneck speed after Walker took office in January.
Archer's current job is one of those formerly civil service positions.
Democratic Assembly Minority Leader Peter Barca said the bill introduced Thursday would ensure political cronies aren't working for Walker and future governors.
Wisconsin Democratic Party Chairman Mike Tate called news of the raid disturbing, and urged Walker to explain any role he may have in the investigation.
Democratic state Sen. Chris Larson, who served 2 1/2 years on the Milwaukee County Board when Walker was county executive, said he's not surprised the governor is trying to distance himself.
"Knowing Walker, having worked with him at the county, he's never been one to admit when he does something wrong," Larson said. "It would be pretty earth-shattering if he did it this time."
The Journal Sentinel reported that people familiar with the investigation who spoke on condition of anonymity said the investigation focuses on the activities of Archer and Tom Nardelli, Walker's former county chief of staff. Both worked three years in Walker's county executive office and both followed him to Madison after the November election.
Nardelli quit his state job in July and did not return messages seeking comment Thursday. Archer served as deputy Department of Administration Secretary until she quit on Aug. 19 and started the Children and Family Services job on Aug. 20 before going on leave.
Walker previously has said he has not been contacted in person by prosecutors but that his campaign had been asked for emails and information related to a staffer in his county office, Darlene Wink, who posted pro-Walker messages on websites on work time. Wink resigned in May 2010 after admitting to posting the anonymous comments on websites and blogs.
Her attorney, Chris Wiesmueller, acknowledged Wink posted the comments, but said Thursday he had no idea whether she was connected to the raid on Archer's house.
"I'm really in the dark in how we get from Darlene to Cynthia Archer," Wiesmueller said.
Authorities several months ago seized work computers used by both Wink and Tim Russell, a former Walker campaign staffer who was working as Milwaukee County housing director. Unlike Archer, neither Wink nor Russell went to work for the state after Walker was elected governor.
Scrutiny of Walker's campaign operations have resulted in one conviction.
William Gardner, president and chief executive officer of Wisconsin & Southern Railroad Co., was sentenced to two years' probation in July after being found guilty of two felonies related to exceeding state campaign donation limits and laundering campaign donations to Walker and other Wisconsin politicians.
Walker's campaign returned the $43,800 in donations Gardner had given him.
___
Ramde reported from Milwaukee. Associated Press writer Todd Richmond also contributed to this report.
9  Messages / Causes & Activism / Re: Madison360: Mantra of wealthy Republicans — we want the rest on: August 15, 2011, 04:52:06 pm
Crime And Courts
Sauk County DA named special prosecutor in alleged state Supreme


Court fracas
Sauk County DA named special prosecutor in alleged state Supreme Court fracas
ED TRELEVEN | etreleven@madison.com | 608-252-6134 madison.com | (2) Comments | Posted: Monday, August 15, 2011 10:57 am
Related Stories
Related: Records of alleged Supreme Court fight won’t be released until special prosecutor’s decision
Related: Dane County DA requests special prosecutor for Supreme Court fracas
More from this section
Records of alleged Supreme Court fight won’t be released until special prosecutor’s decision
Illinois man injured after dive into shallow part of Wisconsin River
Two men get 16 years in prison apiece in rap battle shooting
Iraq War vet gets 1½ years in prison for killing dog
La Crosse Co. deputy facing felony is fired
More...
Sauk County District Attorney Patricia Barrett has been appointed the special prosecutor who will decide whether to pursue any criminal charges involving an alleged June 13 fracas involving state Supreme Court Justices David Prosser and Ann Walsh Bradley.
William Foust, chief judge of the state court system's Fifth District, made the announcement Monday morning.
Barrett, a Republican who has been the DA in Sauk County since 1994, was appointed to handle the case after Dane County District Attorney Ismael Ozanne withdrew from the case to avoid the appearance of a conflict of interest. Ozanne had prosecuted an alleged open meetings violation by a legislative conference committee that was the subject of Supreme Court deliberations at the time of the alleged fracas.
Bradley said that Prosser put his hands around her neck after she told him to leave her office. Prosser denies the allegation.
Ozanne is a Democrat. Prosser is a former Republican state legislator. Foust is a former Dane County DA who held the post as a Democrat. Bradley has never held a partisan political office but is considered a member of the court's liberal wing.
The Dane County Sheriff's Office, which investigated the alleged incident, has refused to release its reports until the special prosecutor decides whether charges will be filed.
Copyright 2011 madison.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 
Posted in Crime_and_courts, Govt-and-politics, Breaking_news on Monday, August 15, 2011 10:57 am


Read more: http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/crime_and_courts/article_c162f396-c757-11e0-a7c1-001cc4c002e0.html#ixzz1V7DPXXIh
10  Messages / Causes & Activism / Madison360: Mantra of wealthy Republicans — we want the rest on: August 15, 2011, 04:51:28 pm
Madison360: Mantra of wealthy Republicans — we want the rest

Madison360: Mantra of wealthy Republicans — we want the rest
PAUL FANLUND | The Capital Times | pfanlund@madison.com madison.com | (56) Comments | Posted: Monday, August 15, 2011 6:45 am
http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/a/1e/a1e285bc-c528-11e0-9efd-001cc4c002e0/4e4598a8a0180.image.jpg
Blog: Madison360
http://host.madison.com/ct/local/madison_360/ http://host.madison.com/ct/local/madison_360/
Paul Fanlund is the editor of The Capital Times, the fifth editor in its history. A long-time Madisonian, he was a State Journal reporter and editor before taking a business job with Madison Newspapers for six years. He joined the Cap Times in 2006. With Madison360, he offers insights into the Cap Times and CT-fueled sites such as 77Square.com and Madison.com sports, and shares information, observations and links to help readers better engage in our always interesting city.
http://host.madison.com/ct/local/madison_360/ http://host.madison.com/ct/local/madison_360/mailto:pfanlund@madison.com mailto:pfanlund@madison.com
More from this section
Madison360: Is a speed trap actually a trap at all?
Madison360: Last-minute reminder of stakes in Tuesday's recalls
Madison360: Why is Paul Soglin so abrasive, and does it matter?
Madison360: Salon makes Wisconsin's voter ID law Exhibit A talking about the "new Jim Crow"
Madison360: Recalls aside, give GOP puppet masters an A+
More...
Before he died in a recent car accident, I'd never heard of Charles Wyly.
He was killed near Aspen, Colo., when his Porsche was struck by a sports utility vehicle. Wyly, 77, and his younger brother became billionaires by building and trading companies from their base in Dallas.
The brothers reportedly gave $10 million to Republican candidates over the years, including $30,000 to the Swift Boat campaign that smeared the Vietnam War record of Democratic presidential nominee John Kerry in 2004. Wyly's obituary in the New York Times said he later regretted not studying the ads more closely.
Last year, the Securities and Exchange Commission filed suit against the brothers for allegedly using offshore havens to hide more than $500 million in profits from insider stock trading, but that's beside the point.
No, my point is that Wyly's activism exemplifies how some of the wealthiest among us are obsessed with buying influence to further shake off tax and regulatory constraints and to expand the already yawning gap between themselves and everyone else.
In Wisconsin and elsewhere, it's working for them. The top 1 percent of U.S. earners receives nearly a quarter of the nation's income, which is more than double their share of the income pie from only 25 years ago.
I recently wrote about how wealthy, masterful Republican strategists are using our formerly progressive state as a proving ground for how to use limitless spending to purchase extreme outcomes. At the same time, they have worked feverishly to slant future elections by destroying unions, distorting political boundaries and suppressing voter turnouts.
The question I keep asking myself, probably naively, is why?
They already have the best houses, the best schools, the best cars and the best medical care. They have the best overall lifestyles and do not need government help. They have already achieved the greatest wealth gap in U.S. history and it is growing. Their tax burden is historically low.
What more, exactly, do they want?
Talk all you want about Gov. Scott Walker and fellow Republicans "leading" in this radical direction. But Walker and more moderate GOP legislators are themselves being led. They are career politicians who keep sashaying to the right for political self-preservation via campaign dollars.
Even ex-Gov. Tommy Thompson, the state's most successful Republican politician of his generation, is dutifully retreating from his laudable record of centrism and even-handedness in submissive pursuit of the big-money crowd to get the 2012 Republican nod for the U.S. Senate. So now he proclaims, he was never for health-care reform or high-speed rail. Yeah, right.
No, the politicians are pawns.
"The brakes are off and that's our system of government now," observes Andrew Kersten, a University of Wisconsin-Green Bay labor historian. Kersten's new book is titled, "The Battle for Wisconsin: Scott Walker and the Attack on the Progressive Tradition." Kersten has been asking why wealthy donors in and out of Wisconsin seem so relentless. "Why are they even doing this? I kept thinking that the people who have the money wouldn't go for everything because they need a middle class to sell to," he says in an interview.
But with global markets, maybe that is wrong, he says. "I don't think they even want the American consumer anymore," Kersten says. "How much money do they want? The answer is they want it all. You almost have to question their patriotism at some point."
A recent in-depth article in Vanity Fair magazine was headlined, "Of the 1%, by the 1%, for the 1%." That top 1 percent controls 40 percent of the nation's wealth and their share is growing rapidly. Their income has increased 18 percent over the past decade while the middle class has seen income fall.
If these are "job creators," the euphemism used by Walker and others to describe the wealthy, where is the evidence? It is pretty clear job creation has much to do with education, infrastructure and technology, headings under which government plays a role. The unabated wealth gap and historically low taxes on the rich do not seem to be working to create jobs for many of us.
The New York Times reported last week that 63 percent of respondents in a Times/CBS News Poll support higher taxes on households earning more than $250,000 a year to help reduce the federal deficit.
But the wealthy, with a stranglehold on the GOP, rejected a deficit deal by President Obama that had spending cuts far greater than tax increases aimed at the wealthy. The resulting turmoil has contributed to the financial market havoc affecting ordinary families who are trying to build wealth to send their children to college or to retire.
In Wisconsin as in Washington, the media have consistently gotten it wrong by suggesting the two parties are equally at fault and need to meet in the middle, says Professor Erik Wright, a UW-Madison sociologist and an expert in the relationship of politics and social class. The political center is where Obama and state Democrats already reside, he says. "The Republican Party has been captured by extreme right-wing ideologues."
In recent days, the post-recall Walker strategy is as transparent as it is ludicrous, but some editorial writers still buy it. Walker is calling for the two parties to work together. Honest to God, he is. This from the guy who only months ago told a congressional committee that bipartisanship is a bad thing. One reason is obvious. Those pulling the GOP strings have forced through all they wanted, so now can afford to pretend they care about the views of roughly half of Wisconsin citizens.
But back to motivations.
In a recent article, a noted psychologist says studies show that rich people really are different. Dacher Keltner, a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, told an MSNBC interviewer that multiple studies produced a consistent outcome. "Lower class people just show more empathy, more prosocial behavior, more compassion, no matter how you look at it," he says.
Beyond that, rich people "think that economic success and political outcomes, and personal outcomes, have to do with individual behavior, a good work ethic," says Keltner.
"Because the rich gloss over the ways family connections, money and education helped," interviewer Brian Alexander writes, paraphrasing Keltner, "they come to denigrate the role of government and vigorously oppose taxes to fund it." (I keep thinking of the words "born on third base but think they hit a triple" and the image of George W. Bush comes to mind.)
Last week, Senate Majority Leader Scott Fitzgerald, a Juneau Republican, proclaimed of the two Republican senators who lost recall elections: "They took a bullet for the taxpayers."
They took a bullet, all right, but it wasn't for taxpayers. It was for the millionaires and billionaires whose water they carried.
Copyright 2011 madison.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 
Posted in Madison_360, Blogs on Monday, August 15, 2011 6:45 am Updated: 7:46 am. Paul Fanlund, Republican, Income Distribution, New York Times, Republican Party, Wisconsin, Scott Walker, Charles Wyly, The New York Times, Andrew Kersten, Dacher Keltner, George W. Bush, John Kerry, Securities And Exchange Commission, Governor, Tommy Thompson, Vanity Fair, Erik Wright, Msnbc, Brian Alexander, Scott Fitzgerald


Read more: http://host.madison.com/ct/news/local/madison_360/article_62dbea3a-c6f8-11e0-910f-001cc4c03286.html#ixzz1V7DWSEXT
11  Messages / Causes & Activism / Wellpoint joins Koch to help fight Senate recalls on: August 04, 2011, 04:54:47 pm
Wellpoint joins Koch to help fight Senate recalls
Story
Discussion
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size
Wellpoint joins Koch to help fight Senate recalls
JONATHAN D. SALANT | Bloomberg News madison.com | (16) Comments | Posted: Thursday, August 4, 2011 9:01 am
Related Stories
Related: Out-of-state groups send in cash to deliver recall message
More from this section
Chalkboard: It’s a long wait or a long haul to get a driver’s license
Soglin kicks off budget conversations Tuesday night
Connecting the dots: Center for Media and Democracy tracks ALEC’s vast legislative influence
Monona Terrace backers say Madison needs bigger hotel to play in big leagues
Hard work and fundraising success propel Chris Taylor to the state Assembly
More...
WASHINGTON — Republican and Democratic groups are pouring money into Wisconsin with eight legislative recalls scheduled this month and control of the state Senate hanging in the balance.
The Republican State Leadership Committee, based in Alexandria, Va., has spent about $370,000 on the special elections, while the Washington-based Democratic Legislative Campaign Committee has spent about $250,000, according to documents filed with the Wisconsin Government Accountability Board in Madison.
Wellpoint Inc., an Indianapolis-based health insurer that has been critical of the new federal health-care law, is among the top donors to Republican organizations active in the contests, including $450,000 to the RSLC and $250,000 to the Republican Governors Association.
Wellpoint gave $842,000 to the RSLC for the 2010 elections. State officials are playing a key role in implementing — or fighting — the new health law. Kristin Binns, a Wellpoint spokeswoman, didn't return a phone call seeking comment.
"Big Labor has made Wisconsin their Waterloo," the RSLC states on its website, seeking donations to help the Republican lawmakers facing recall elections following their support of Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's legislation to take away bargaining rights of state workers. Walker said the law was necessary to trim spending and balance the state budget.
Overall, the national groups trying to elect Republican governors, legislators and other state officials almost doubled Democratic fundraising, new Internal Revenue Service records show.
The Republican groups reported raising $28 million between Jan. 1 and June 30, compared with $15 million for their Democratic counterparts. Unlike the national political parties, these committees can accept contributions from corporate and union treasuries, and unlimited donations from individuals.
The RSLC's chairman, Ed Gillespie, is a former aide to President George W. Bush. Gillespie worked with former Bush political strategist Karl Rove in 2010 to create American Crossroads. American Crossroads and its related organization Crossroads GPS spent $38 million last year in support of Republican congressional candidates. In March, Crossroads GPS spent $750,000 in ads supporting Walker's new anti-labor law, according to the Center for Media and Democracy.
"Wisconsin is a huge priority," said Carolyn Fiddler, a DLCC spokeswoman.
The Republican and Democratic state legislative groups are just two of more than two dozen outside groups active in the special elections.
The Democrats need to capture three Republican-held seats to secure a majority in the state Senate. The first Wisconsin recall, on July 19, saw the Democratic incumbent hold his seat. On Aug. 9, six Republican senators who supported Walker's labor bill will face recalls. Two more Democratic incumbents will face recall elections on Aug. 16.
"A lot of Republicans have looked to Wisconsin to see what they're getting away with and what Republicans elsewhere can get away with without incurring too much backlash," Fiddler said.
Among the national groups that focus on state races, the most prolific fundraiser was the RGA, which raised $22.2 million in the first six months of this year. Of that sum, $1 million came from David Koch, the executive vice president of Wichita, Kan.-based Koch Industries Inc. Another $500,000 was given by Kenneth Griffin, chief executive officer of the Chicago-based hedge fund Citadel Investment Group.
The head of the RGA, Texas Gov. Rick Perry, is mulling a run for the White House in 2012. In a statement, the RGA said its fundraising was a record for the first half of a year before a presidential election, and was more than it collected in all of 2007.
Koch also gave $1 million last year to the RGA, which helped elect Republicans such as Walker. His anti-union legislation had the support of the Koch-funded Americans for Prosperity advocacy group. Melissa Cohlmia, a spokeswoman for Koch Industries, didn't respond to a request for comment.
Other RGA contributors included Texas businessmen Trevor Rees-Jones, who donated $257,300, and homebuilder Bob Perry, who provided $250,000.
The Democratic Governors Association raised $11 million, including $100,000 donations each from the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees and the International Brotherhood of Teamsters.
Several companies regulated by state governments contributed to both governors' associations, including Dallas- based AT&T, which gave $255,000 to the Republican governors and $150,000 to the Democratic governors; and Atlanta-based utility Southern Co., which gave $100,000 to both.
"We're supportive of and work constructively with the governments in our regulated states — regardless of party — in order to develop sound energy policy that protects the interest of our customers, promotes economic development and creates jobs," said Valerie Hendrickson, a spokeswoman for Southern.
AT&T also gave $60,000 to the RSLC and $10,000 to the Democratic Attorneys General Association. An AT&T spokeswoman, Claudia Jones, declined to comment.
The U.S. Chamber of Commerce contributed $125,000 to the Republican governors and $100,000 to the Democrats.
The Democratic Attorneys General Association raised $1.6 million, including $357,650 from law firms. Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld donated $15,000 and Nix Patterson & Roach LLP, trial lawyers, contributed $50,000.


Read more: http://host.madison.com/ct/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_9821745c-bea2-11e0-8405-001cc4c03286.html#ixzz1U4xPKT6k
12  Messages / Causes & Activism / Out-of-state groups send in cash to deliver recall message on: August 03, 2011, 04:55:10 pm
Out-of-state groups send in cash to deliver recall message
Story
Discussion
Image (2)
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size
Out-of-state groups send in cash to deliver recall message
JESSICA VANEGEREN | The Capital times | jvanegeren@madison.com madison.com | (26) Comments | Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 5:30 am
http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/40/f40697fc-bd62-11e0-a5cf-001cc4c03286/4e388e87ef0d0.image.jpg
http://pictopia.com/perl/ptp/madison?photo_name=9e4146c9-2c25-5f33-9a7e-ce604315a2cd&title=CT Cover Recall Money 8_11&t_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/40/f40697fc-bd62-11e0-a5cf-001cc4c03286/4e388e87ef0d0.image.jpg&fs_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/40/f40697fc-bd62-11e0-a5cf-001cc4c03286/4e388e898d485.hires.jpg&pps=buynow http://pictopia.com/perl/ptp/madison?photo_name=9e4146c9-2c25-5f33-9a7e-ce604315a2cd&title=CT Cover Recall Money 8_11&t_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/40/f40697fc-bd62-11e0-a5cf-001cc4c03286/4e388e87ef0d0.image.jpg&fs_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/f/40/f40697fc-bd62-11e0-a5cf-001cc4c03286/4e388e898d485.hires.jpg&pps=buynow
 Loading…
/ct/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_9e4146c9-2c25-5f33-9a7e-ce604315a2cd.html" \l "1 /ct/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_9e4146c9-2c25-5f33-9a7e-ce604315a2cd.html" \l "1
/ct/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_9e4146c9-2c25-5f33-9a7e-ce604315a2cd.html" \l "2 /ct/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_9e4146c9-2c25-5f33-9a7e-ce604315a2cd.html" \l "2
Related Stories
Related: Recall chart info
More from this section
Q&A: Soglin says he's got a lot of housecleaning to do
Chalkboard: It’s a long wait or a long haul to get a driver’s license
Soglin kicks off budget conversations Tuesday night
Connecting the dots: Center for Media and Democracy tracks ALEC’s vast legislative influence
Monona Terrace backers say Madison needs bigger hotel to play in big leagues
More...
Sandwiched between Klinke Cleaners and Check ‘n Go in a strip mall in Sun Prairie is one of the biggest financial players in Wisconsin’s historic round of recall elections.
But don’t be fooled by the 1223 W. Main St., #304 address. The conservative, pro-business Wisconsin Club for Growth boasts no posh suite, just a simple mailbox at a UPS store. While its office presence may be lacking, its political influence is not.
To date, Wisconsin Club for Growth has spent an estimated $3 million to $4 million on “issue” ads for and against candidates in the state’s recall elections. That’s far more than the $1 million it spent cumulatively on elections in the state over the past four years.
The power of that money is being seen in select markets across the state by television viewers who are being assailed by hard-hitting, 30-second attack ads. And, keep in mind that as an issue ad organization, Wisconsin Club for Growth does not have to report who its donors are or what it spends.
Wisconsin Club for Growth is just one of 56 groups that have simultaneously cranked open the campaign spending spigot, releasing a record stream of cash into Wisconsin to influence the state’s nine recall elections. Most of the groups have ties to outside interests: labor unions, national political parties, business advocates, the tea party, school choice or President Obama’s re-election campaign, among others.
The result is an estimated $10 million to $12 million spent by outside groups on advertising in various forms since statewide protests erupted in February over Republican Gov. Scott Walker’s proposal, since enacted, to curb the collective bargaining rights of most public workers.
Total spending could hit $20 million to $25 million, estimates Mike McCabe, the executive director of the Wisconsin Democracy Campaign, which has been tracking special-interest spending. Common Cause of Wisconsin predicts as much as $30 million will be spent.
Both conservative and liberal groups cite the historic effort to unseat nine state senators – three Democrats and six Republicans – as a test of how far a GOP governor and Republican-led Legislature can push a pro-business, anti-union agenda and budget strategy that cuts state spending at the expense of public education, public workers and health care programs, among others, before feeling repercussions at the polls.
But the groups are not just focused on maintaining or overturning Republican control of the state Capitol. Officials with a number of the special-interest groups say they are also looking to send a message and lay the groundwork for the 2012 presidential race.
“The behavior by these groups is proof they see these elections as having broad national consequences,” says Charles Franklin, a political science professor with UW-Madison. “Otherwise, they wouldn’t be pouring money into the state.”
Indeed, Wisconsin has become ground zero in a national showdown over opposing political philosophies about the role of government. If the Democrats take control of the state Senate through the recall elections, observers say it will signal a resurgence of the Democratic Party after its crippling losses in the 2010 elections.
Democrats in Wisconsin have scored one win already, with Sen. Dave Hansen, D-Green Bay, easily retaining his Senate seat in a recall election last month. The contest continues Aug. 9, with recall elections for six incumbent Republicans, followed by the final recall elections for two incumbent Democrats Aug. 16. Democrats must win five of the remaining eight elections to take control of the state Senate.
To date, 42 political action committees and 14 “issue ad” groups have contributed to the $10 million to $12 million that has been spent on advertising for the nine recall elections. McCabe says these special-interest groups could “easily” break the $15 million mark by the time the elections are over.
Broadcasters are not required by law to report what the issue ad groups spend on ads. But many are cooperating with Wisconsin Democracy Campaign’s project to report on outside spending in Wisconsin races. A final tally on how much is spent will not be known until after the Aug. 16 elections.
Political action committees, or PACs, are private groups that can be created by unions, special-interest groups and corporations to support candidates or issues in an election. PACs must register with the Wisconsin Government Accountability Board and report where their money comes from and how it’s spent.
In contrast, an issue ad group, does not have to register with the state board or report its spending. It’s parent organization often has an innocuous name, like Citizens for a Strong America.
By avoiding so-called “magic words” in their ads – “vote for,” “support,” “elect,” “vote against,” “defeat,” “reject” – the issue ad groups bypass reporting requirements. Still, an ad without the magic words gets its message across to voters.
“Coca-Cola never says ‘Buy Coca-Cola.’ Walmart never says ‘Shop at Walmart,’” McCabe says. “But you know from watching the commercial they want you to buy Coca-Cola and they want you to shop at Walmart.”
To date, the top issue ad spender in the recall elections is Wisconsin Club for Growth. We Are Wisconsin, a coalition of labor groups including the AFL-CIO and AFSCME that was created in March to back Democrats in the Senate recalls, has spent about $4 million, the bulk of the $6.1 million spent by the 42 PACs.
McCabe says the growth in both the number of groups pouring money into the recall elections and the large sums they’ve raised and spent on ads is a drastic change from what was happening in the state even a few years ago.
“Spending by registered groups (PACs) in the fall of 2010 was $3.75 million,” McCabe points out, for all legislative races statewide. “When this is done, their spending will have more than doubled, perhaps tripled, that amount, for just nine recall elections.”
The special interest money game has exploded in the past decade. In the fall 2000 legislative election season, 16 PACs and five issue ad groups bought ads in Wisconsin. Total spending was just under $3 million, with the Wisconsin Education Association Council, the state’s largest teachers union, topping the list of spenders at $1.05 million.
Wisconsin Manufacturers & Commerce, who pioneered the use of the issue ad in Wisconsin in 1996 and injected unregulated corporate money into election advertising for the first time, also was a major spender.
Those two groups, WEAC and WMC, used to be the dominant two spenders, McCabe says. Then what he calls “phony front groups” that represent outside interests began to proliferate, not to lobby for issues they support, as WEAC and WMC did, but simply to influence elections.
“They emerge during election seasons, and they spend boatloads of money,” McCabe says. “They’ve really taken over.”
On July 20, Denise Feriozzi, the executive director of Emily’s List, a national, Washington D.C.-based organization dedicated to electing pro-choice, Democratic women to office, landed in Wisconsin. Her visit was a first on many fronts.
While Emily’s List commonly endorses and contributes to female candidates for office at all levels, Feriozzi says there is more at stake in Wisconsin.
Walker and the Republicans “ignited a national firestorm of outrage by trying to take away the programs and services that matter most to American women and families,” says Feriozzi, citing cuts to education and reproductive health care as two examples.
Feriozzi described Emily’s List’s involvement in the Wisconsin recalls as “unprecedented.” In addition to endorsing all five of the women trying to unseat Republican senators (former Brown County Executive Nancy Nusbaum; Rep. Sandy Pasch of Whitefish Bay; educator Shelly Moore; former Oshkosh Deputy Mayor Jessica King, and Rep. Jennifer Shilling of La Crosse), the organization is activating its national phone bank to allow its members to call Wisconsin voters and will be knocking on doors the weekend of Aug. 6-7 to talk to voters about what’s at stake.
Feriozzi says thousands of dollars will be spent through Wisconsin Women Vote!, an independent expenditure arm of Emily’s List, to run ads in the Twin Cities TV market against Moore’s competitor, incumbent Sen. Sheila Harsdorf, R-River Falls, and against Sen. Dan Kapanke, R-La Crosse, who is being challenged by Shilling.
One ad, titled “Send Kapanke Packing” begins with a black Lincoln Town Car with tinted windows speeding down a country road on its way to pick up two businessmen. On its way, it passes a young girl sitting at a desk, an elderly couple sitting alongside the road on a park bench and a family of four eating dinner.
“Put middle-class families first. And send Kapanke packing,” says the narrator. The ad is being run in conjunction with We Are Wisconsin.
Feriozzi says Republicans in Wisconsin and in Washington are “overreaching because of some mandate they think they got from the voters during the last election. I expect what happens in Wisconsin to have significance up and down the ballot in 2012.”
So do many others.
To date, the Washington, D.C.-based Progressive Change Campaign Committee, (known as Bold Progressives), in conjunction with Democracy for America, has spent roughly $1 million on ads in Wisconsin, says co-founder Adam Green. The organization, normally focused on candidates for federal office, plans to spend another half a million before the recall elections conclude.
Green says the various outside groups are involved in Wisconsin’s recall elections to stop a larger pattern of what they see as an attack on middle-class families.
“A Democratic win sends a message that when Republicans flagrantly buck the will of the voters and attack workers, they will be punished,” Green says. “It is collective bargaining plus other issues. It’s cuts to schools, while tax cuts are being given to large corporations.”
Nationally, he sees a parallel track that Republicans are following, including Wisconsin Congressman Paul Ryan’s proposal to give tax cuts to the wealthy while cutting Medicare.
Bold Progressives has been one of the more prominent national voices criticizing President Obama for straying too far from the principles of the liberal base, says Green. It has told its members not to volunteer for Obama in 2012 if he makes any cuts to Social Security, Medicare or Medicaid.
“We’re in Wisconsin to send a message to Obama,” Green says. “When Democrats like the Wisconsin 14 stand strong for working families, they will be rewarded by our votes.”
Wisconsin’s recall elections aren’t just being used as a vehicle to send Obama a message from the left. Messages also are coming from the right.
The California-based Campaign to Defeat Barack Obama, a sister group to the national Tea Party Express PAC, is raising money and running ads in Wisconsin. One ad calls for supporters to help “tell Barack Obama and his liberal hacks” that they “reject their unhelpful intervention” in Wisconsin politics.
The ad states: “Gov. Walker and the Republicans are providing the adult leadership Wisconsin needs to restore fiscal responsibility to the Badger State. But Barack Obama’s political allies, including MoveOn.org, are spending millions to block these important reforms. Now, they are even trying to recall the Republican senators who stayed in Madison and did their jobs well.”
The fight over collective bargaining rights, which began in February and led to the recall efforts, saw all 14 of Wisconsin’s Democratic senators leave the state for weeks to avoid voting on a bill that ultimately was passed by Republicans alone, using a controversial procedural move. Walker’s direct assault on union power is part of a similar effort in other GOP-led states. The recall elections will repudiate or endorse that effort.
“A number of governors across the country who have also moved to trim spending, leading to a reduction in employee benefits and employee rights, are watching and waiting,” says Franklin, the UW prof. “Wisconsin is an indicator of how far they can go.”
The list of powerful political players spending money on the recall efforts continues to grow.
Club for Growth; Citizens for a Strong America, a conservative group funded by the billionaire Koch brothers that has bought several hundred thousand dollars worth of ads; and the pro-school choice American Federation for Children, a relatively unheard-of group in Wisconsin until now, are among those supporting Walker and the GOP senators targeted for recall.
National Club for Growth spokesman Barney Keller says Wisconsin represents a larger debate playing out nationally over how much economic freedom versus regulation should be allowed in America. In his organization’s view, stripping collective bargaining rights from workers is a positive step toward economic growth.
“Collective bargaining locks in the price of labor,” Keller says. “We think that is inefficient and anti-growth. People should be paid for what they’re worth.”
The American Federation for Children, a Washington D.C.-based group chaired by Michigan billionaire Betsy DeVos, has begun running ads in Wisconsin in support of Walker and the Republicans’ effort to expand the school voucher program in Wisconsin. Former Republican Rep. Scott Jensen is the federation’s senior policy adviser.
In addition to running ads, the American Federation of Children also sponsored automated telephone calls to the Republican senators’ constituents during the petition drive for the recalls, urging them not to support a recall just because they might disagree with their senator over asking union members to pay more toward their pension and health care costs.
Among Wisconsin Club for Growth’s TV ads was one that aired in June and featured video clips of Democratic candidate Shelly Moore, who’s opposing Republican Sen. Sheila Harsdorf, loudly addressing crowds at several rallies.
The ad ends with a narrator saying, “Tell Shelly Moore we need solutions, not shouting.”
The average voter would likely not realize the ad is being paid for by a special-interest group, says McCabe. Instead, they would think it was paid for by Harsdorf.
“A lot of times, these groups do the dirty work,” McCabe says. “They get down in the gutter for the candidates.”
He says because the average voter doesn’t understand the sophisticated level on which the political game is now played, most voters don’t separate attack ads from the candidates themselves.
“Even though people say they tune the ads out, you’ll hear people talk about the issues and many of them will use sound bits they heard on the commercials,” McCabe says. “On some level these ads are working, which is unfortunate, because they are the worst places for people to get their information.”
While the state’s political fights, including the barrage of ads, have turned off some voters, they are what prompted one Wisconsin father and educator to agree to be featured in an issue ad.
Jay Jones, the father of three and resident of a small town north of Berlin in Waushara County, agreed to participate in an ad against Republican Sen. Luther Olsen. The ad, paid for by Bold Progressives and Democracy for America, criticizes Olsen for voting to cut state aid to public education.
As a result of that reduced funding, a small kindergarten through fourth grade school with about 75 kids will close this fall. Jones’ two younger children will be moved to a different school.
“I was not a huge political activist. In fact, I was kind of turned off by politics,” Jones says. “But I couldn’t just stand by and watch was happening to our schools.”
He says his appearance on the commercial prompted a few difficult discussions with some people, even a call from one person who shouted “You’re liars!” and then hung up after his wife answered the phone.
“I didn’t anticipate all the stuff that would happen when the commercial came out,” Jones says. “But it’s worth it. The changes to collective bargaining make me angry, but it’s really the cuts. The cuts aren’t good for anybody.”
Copyright 2011 madison.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 
Posted in Govt-and-politics on Wednesday, August 3, 2011 5:30 am Updated: 5:42 am. Recall Election, Mike Mccabe, Wisconsin Club For Growth, Wisconsin Education Association Council, Scott Walker, Sheila Harsdorf, Charles Franklin, Citizens For A Strong America, Denise Feriozzi, Adam Green, Shelly Moore, Dave Hansen, Barney Keller, Nancy Nusbaum, Jennifer Shilling, Jessica King, Sandy Pasch, Dan Kapanke


Read more: http://host.madison.com/ct/news/local/govt-and-politics/article_9e4146c9-2c25-5f33-9a7e-ce604315a2cd.html#ixzz1Tz2vzRn2
13  Messages / Causes & Activism / Both parties suspect other of deceit in recall elections on: August 03, 2011, 04:54:36 pm
Both parties suspect other of deceit in recall elections
Story
Discussion
More
Font Size:
Default font size
Larger font size
Both parties suspect other of deceit in recall elections
SCOTT BAUER | Associated Press madison.com | (13) Comments | Posted: Wednesday, August 3, 2011 9:00 am
http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df24a410-bb8b-11e0-b95f-001cc4c03286/4e35782fefba0.image.jpg
http://pictopia.com/perl/ptp/madison?photo_name=e59df64e-bdd8-11e0-8692-001cc4c002e0&title=capitol building protest file photo&t_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df24a410-bb8b-11e0-b95f-001cc4c03286/4e35782fefba0.image.jpg&fs_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df24a410-bb8b-11e0-b95f-001cc4c03286/4e3578321bea1.hires.jpg&pps=buynow http://pictopia.com/perl/ptp/madison?photo_name=e59df64e-bdd8-11e0-8692-001cc4c002e0&title=capitol building protest file photo&t_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df24a410-bb8b-11e0-b95f-001cc4c03286/4e35782fefba0.image.jpg&fs_url=http://bloximages.chicago2.vip.townnews.com/host.madison.com/content/tncms/assets/v3/editorial/d/f2/df24a410-bb8b-11e0-b95f-001cc4c03286/4e3578321bea1.hires.jpg&pps=buynowCRAIG SCHREINER – State Journal
A large crowd rallies to protest Gov. Scott Walker's collective bargaining bill at the Capitol in this February 2011 file photo.
Related Stories
Related: In recall campaigns, union is a dirty word — on both sides
Related: Hansen will keep Senate seat after recall attempt fails
Related: Senate passes redistricting maps on party line vote
Related: GOP redistricting plan would create political 'islands' in Madison and Dane County
Political coverage on Twitter
 
      
http://twitter.com/" \l "!/madpolitics http://twitter.com/" \l "!/madpolitics   Madison.com Politics
@MadPolitics
All Wisconsin politics. All the time. For the junkie in us all.    
More from this section
AP analysis: Parties spent $4.2 million in 6 state recalls
Some absentee ballot applications may have errors
In recall campaigns, union is a dirty word — on both sides
Fire destroys Democratic recall group's headquarters
National chairman: RNC is 'all in' on Wisconsin recall elections
More...
The Wisconsin Democratic Party on Tuesday called for an investigation into whether a conservative group tried to suppress turnout in next week's recall elections targeting Republican state senators by telling voters that absentee ballots received a day after election day would be counted.
Meanwhile, elections regulators said the Democratic National Committee promised to stop calling voters in one of the Republicans' districts after it gave some of his constituents the wrong election date in automated calls last week.
With control of the state Senate at stake, the two sides have spent millions in the lead-up to the Aug. 9 recall elections targeting six Senate Republicans and the Aug. 16 elections targeting two Democrats. Retaining GOP control of both legislative chambers would allow Republican Gov. Scott Walker to continue to advance his conservative agenda unimpeded, while a net gain of three seats would give Democrats control of the Senate and a check on the governor's power.
The Wisconsin Democratic Party filed a complaint Monday with the state Government Accountability Board, which oversees elections, alleging that absentee ballot applications mailed out by Americans for Prosperity, a conservative group that has spent heavily to help the Republicans, were intended to suppress turnout. And on Tuesday, state Democratic Party Chairman Mike Tate sent a request for an investigation to U.S. Attorney James Santelle. His office declined to comment on the matter.
The mailing, which the group says was sent to about 10,000 voters in the six Republican senators' districts, states that absentee ballots received the Thursday before the election will be counted, which is accurate. But in a section that gives step-by-step instructions, the letter states that ballots received before Aug. 11 by city clerks would be counted.
Americans for Prosperity state director Matt Seaholm said Tuesday that a typo was to blame for the error and he called the complaints over the mailing frivolous.
"You see this all the time at the end of an election, people trying to make a headline out of something," he said.
Seaholm said his group only sent the absentee ballot applications to people who signed up for its mailing list, including some Democrats.
"We want to make sure they get out and vote, that's the whole point of this," he said.
Two Democrats who received the AFP mailing and live in the districts of Republican Sen. Sheila Harsdorf of River Falls and Rob Cowles of Allouez also filed complaints with the elections board.
"I believe I was targeted by this Republican group because I am a Democrat and a senior citizen," Charles E. Schultz, of Hudson, wrote in his complaint. Schultz told The Associated Press he is an active Democrat and a liberal and has no idea how he would have gotten onto the AFP mailing list.
Seaholm said there were supposed to be separate mailings for the Aug. 9 and Aug. 16 elections, and that each was to list the different deadlines on which ballots must be received. But he said the letters that went to the six Republican districts were not caught before they were sent. Aug. 11 is the deadline for requesting ballots for the Aug. 16 elections, and ballots will be counted if received by election day.
Americans for Prosperity is spending hundreds of thousands of dollars on television ads in support of the Republican candidates. The group was founded by billionaire conservative activists David and Charles Koch.
On the Democratic side, the DNC was placing robocalls last week to voters in Republican Sen. Dan Kapanke's western Wisconsin district urging them to vote in the election, but wrongly gave the date as Aug. 16.
Reid Magney, a spokesman for the Government Accountability Board, said once the DNC was contacted and told of the error they told election officials the calls would stop. A spokesman for the DNC did not immediately return a message Tuesday.
The date errors in both the calls and the absentee ballot applications spurred the GAB to urge voters to be cautious in the days leading up to the election. While it is legal for groups to send absentee ballot applications to voters, accountability board director Kevin Kennedy said anyone who wishes to vote absentee should contact local election officials and not rely on mailings they may receive.
The deadline for requesting an absentee ballot by mail is the Thursday before the election. Voters can cast absentee ballots in person up until the Friday before the election and they can be returned by mail up until election day.
Copyright 2011 madison.com. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.
 
Posted in Elections on Wednesday, August 3, 2011 9:00 am Updated: 9:59 am. Recall Elections, Government Accountability Board, Mike Tate, James Santelle, Americans For Prosperity, Matt Seaholm, Reid Magney, Kevin Kennedy,


Read more: http://host.madison.com/wsj/news/local/govt-and-politics/elections/article_e59df64e-bdd8-11e0-8692-001cc4c002e0.html#ixzz1Tz2qwBxy
14  General Category / Sports / Buyer Beware on: August 03, 2011, 04:53:54 pm
Buyer Beware
Broglio believes Cards knew of arm injury when trading him to Cubs for Brock
Email
Print
Comments/chicago/conversations/_/id/6053505/ernie-broglio-shares-real-story-chicago-cubs-historically-bad-trade
By William Weinbaum
Special to ESPNChicago.com
Archive
 
There was an error processing the video you requested. Please try again.
Deadline Deal: Brock For Broglio
In 1964, the Cubs made one of the most infamous trade deadline deals in baseball history, sending Lou Brock to St. Louis for Ernie BroglioTags: CubsDeadline Deal: Brock For Broglio
SAN JOSE, Calif., and COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- Despite spending nearly a half-century as prominent evidence of the "curse" on the Cubs, Ernie Broglio cheerfully takes all calls that come his way for appearances, autographs and answers.
But until now, Broglio said, he's never publicly shared what he thinks is the key to the story behind his star-crossed arrival in Chicago. He added that plenty of people ask him what happened, but few, if any, ask him why he was involved in what might be the most lopsided trade ever.
* * * * * * *
As a rookie pitcher with the Cardinals in 1959, the Bay Area native and his wife, Barbara, spent nearly $21,000 to buy a house in a residential neighborhood of San Jose, Calif. The next year Broglio won a league-high 21 games, had a 2.74 ERA, finished third in the Cy Young Award voting and doubled his salary to $20,000.
Many families with homes on their street have come and gone in the past 52 years. The Broglios, however, still live in the same house where they raised their four children.
Now a 75-year-old great-grandfather, Broglio has Type 2 diabetes, but he regularly takes long walks, goes golfing and tutors teenage pitchers.
  • Enlarge\l ""
ESPNNow a 75-year-old great-grandfather, Broglio has Type 2 Diabetes, but he regularly golfs and tutors teenage pitchers.The wall of fame in his throwback den flashes back to Broglio on the cover of Sports Illustrated facing Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda of the Giants and to plaques presented to him for the 1960 season when the young righty was St. Louis' finest. The wall also showcases shots of Hall of Fame legends Bob Gibson, Stan Musial, Sandy Koufax and Lou Brock.
Last week the white-haired and welcoming Broglio adjusted his glasses and drew close to the Brock photo to read aloud for an ESPN camera crew the inscription from the left fielder who was never his teammate. Brock wrote that Broglio was a "hellava (sic) player" and that "history and time have tied us together."
That history goes back to the trade deadline, June 15, 1964. That day began with Brock a Cub and Broglio a Cardinal.
Chicago had a 27-27 record, sufficient for sixth place in the 10-team National League and better than most years in an inglorious era. The perennial second-division team hadn't been to a World Series since 1945.
Things weren't much different at the moment for their archrival Cardinals, who hadn't made it to the Series since winning the championship in '46 and were in eighth place, three games under .500.
The two mediocre ballclubs swapped six players before the deadline, with the Cubs shipping Jack Spring, Paul Toth and Brock to the Cards for Doug Clemens, Bobby Shantz and Broglio.
Brock and Broglio were and remain the significant names.
* * * * * * *
Broglio is up there, or more aptly down there, with Bartman and the Billy Goat in the annals of angst for baseball's longest-suffering franchise. Brock evokes Redbird reverence befitting the National League stolen-base king and 3,000-hit club member.
But when the trade was made, many considered the deal a steal -- for the Cubs. They had essentially exchanged an unproven and defensively challenged outfielder three days short of his 25th birthday for an established 28-year-old pitcher who'd won 18 games the previous season.
"Everybody thought it was a good trade at that time," Hall of Fame Cubs outfielder Billy Williams said last weekend in Cooperstown, where he returns annually for induction festivities. While describing Broglio as a "great pitcher," Williams gestured to demonstrate the precipitous drop of the "12 to 6" curveball he recalls the 6-foot-2 Broglio throwing as a Cardinal.
"Perhaps, at that time, the best curveball in baseball," according to Brock, who also was interviewed in Cooperstown.
"The only track record I had was two left feet," he said.
Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst, a Cardinals coach at the time, said last weekend the St. Louis management asked for his thoughts on Brock before the trade. He said he was impressed with Brock's speed and his potential, but "nobody knew that Lou was going to be good that quick and right off the bat."
Brock, who was concerned he'd be demoted to the minors until the move to St. Louis, said the trade instilled in him a new confidence because "I now had value -- who is that value? Ernie Broglio. What has he done? 20-game winner."
His former team's perspective, Brock said, was easy to understand.
"Broglio could be a starter as well as a long relief man and he had been a winner with the Cardinals, and there was no reason why he should not have been a winner in Chicago."
But Broglio said there was indeed a reason and that the Cubs have never known what he believes motivated the Cardinals to trade him besides the opportunity to get Brock.
"They got a heckuva ballplayer; they gave up damaged goods," Broglio said. "I think that they knew I had a bad arm."
Broglio said he was already over a problem he had experienced two years before, when he had cortisone shots every other start for a troublesome shoulder, but he had hurt his elbow late in '63 and was still suffering as he struggled to a 3-5 record at the time of the trade. He said he received regular treatment for the elbow from the Cardinals' trainer and occasional cortisone shots, too.
  • Enlarge\l ""
Getty ImagesLou Brock hit .297 and stole 888 bases in 16 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals."I think the Cardinals knew a lot -- a lot more than what I knew of the injury," Broglio said. "So that's why I think they decided that they send the bad arm problem, get rid of him."
Schoendienst said although he knew beforehand of St. Louis's interest in Brock, he wasn't aware of a desire to deal Broglio. "I'm sure the Cardinals didn't make the trade because they thought his arm was bad. I'm sure they didn't."
According to Broglio, there were telling signs in some of his bad performances.
"If I remember right, at one time I threw about four or five wild pitches in one ballgame and Bob Uecker was catching and I kind of jokingly said, 'How come you didn't protect me?' He couldn't. He couldn't have caught the ball or stopped the ball," Broglio said, laughing.
"They were so far in front of home plate that there was an indication that I had problems with my elbow."
The records from '64 reveal that Broglio threw three wild pitches in a game the Cardinals hosted on May 19. Uecker was behind the plate as Broglio also gave up five walks in 6 1/3 innings. The opponent and winner? The Chicago Cubs.
* * * * * * *
Brock said that when he joined the Cardinals, manager Johnny Keane gave him marching, actually speeding, orders and said he needed to become the team's version of the Dodgers' record-setting base stealer, Maury Wills. Although he was skeptical, Brock said he came to consider it the green light that turned his career around.
Thriving immediately for his new team in his new role, Brock batted .348 and stole 33 bases as the catalyst for the surprising world champions of 1964. He spent 16 seasons in St. Louis, surpassed single-season and career stolen-base records set by Wills and Ty Cobb, won another World Series in '67 and a pennant in '68, and earned induction into the Hall of Fame in 1985.
"If he could have stayed with the Chicago Cubs and put those kinds of numbers on the board for the Chicago Cubs, I think you might be seeing we wouldn't have to wait another hundred years to see a World Series," Williams said.
Broglio had just four wins the rest of the '64 season with Chicago, and after his elbow locked up in August, he had surgery in November. Broglio returned to pitching three months later in spring training but allowed more than six runs a game for the Cubs in 1965 and '66. He won three games, lost 12 and never appeared again in the major leagues.
When told of Broglio's assertion that the Cardinals knew they were dealing away damaged goods, Williams said, "That's how the game was played then. Any time a general manager felt he could put stuff on another organization, that's what they did.
  • Enlarge\l ""
AP Photo/Harry L. HallErnie Broglio appeared in just 59 games for the Cubs, posting a 7-19 record and 5.40 ERA."When he came to Chicago, you really knew something happened, you knew something was going on," Williams said. "It probably lost 2 or 3 miles per hour off his fastball; the curveball didn't go down."
"[The Cubs] didn't have a clue about it, and I pitched with pain," Broglio said.
"In those days, you didn't approach the front office, you didn't approach anybody. I didn't want to lose my job."
Cardinals general manager Bing Devine, who engineered the Brock-for-Broglio deal, wasn't with the team to enjoy the first fall fruits of the trade. He was fired that August, before the team surged to the top of the standings, and was later named Executive of the Year by the Sporting News. St. Louis rehired him in 1968, after he had missed both World Series titles achieved with Brock.
Devine died in 2007 and Cardinals trainer Bob Bowman, who treated Broglio, and Cubs general manager John Holland, who traded for him, are also dead.
* * * * * * *
The 1964 surgery to reset Broglio's ulnar nerve left a nine-inch scar on, above and below his elbow that he calls "snake river." And he said there's also numbness to this day in two of his fingers.
Although he laments returning so quickly from the operation and wonders whether his career might have been salvaged if Tommy John surgery had been an option back then, Broglio said he's not bitter about the trade or its enduring burden.
In fact, Broglio reaped a gratifying benefit from being traded for Brock -- a lasting friendship with him. Their most recent get-together was two years ago when Brock, whom Broglio calls a "great individual," invited him to a benefit in St. Louis for his 70th birthday.
"Ernie is top of the charts," Brock said. "He is a good man, a man with integrity. We have a good relationship because we laugh, we talk, and people, for whatever reason, are still interested [in the trade]."
Brock and Broglio were in Chicago for a Cubs old-timers game in 1987 and were introduced to the Wrigley Field crowd. The reaction to the announcement of Broglio's name, he said, was "probably the only standing ovation boos that any athlete would ever get."
But for Brock, whose superb career was emblematic of many a missed Cubs opportunity, the fans stood and were "clapping, hooraying and everything else," Broglio said.
A self-deprecating sense of humor has probably served Broglio well in coming to terms with his unfulfilled pitching promise and his role in the success of others.
"I congratulate all the Hall of Famers," he said. "Some I played ball with, some I helped put there."
William Weinbaum is an "Outside the Lines" producer and worked with Geoff Brown and Jeff Ausiello on this report and the Brock-for-Broglio TV feature scheduled to air on "Baseball Tonight" on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. ET on ESPN2 and 7 p.m. ET on ESPN.
15  General Category / Sports / Buyer Beware on: August 03, 2011, 04:53:36 pm
Buyer Beware
Broglio believes Cards knew of arm injury when trading him to Cubs for Brock
Email
Print
Comments/chicago/conversations/_/id/6053505/ernie-broglio-shares-real-story-chicago-cubs-historically-bad-trade
By William Weinbaum
Special to ESPNChicago.com
Archive
 
There was an error processing the video you requested. Please try again.
Deadline Deal: Brock For Broglio
In 1964, the Cubs made one of the most infamous trade deadline deals in baseball history, sending Lou Brock to St. Louis for Ernie BroglioTags: CubsDeadline Deal: Brock For Broglio
SAN JOSE, Calif., and COOPERSTOWN, N.Y. -- Despite spending nearly a half-century as prominent evidence of the "curse" on the Cubs, Ernie Broglio cheerfully takes all calls that come his way for appearances, autographs and answers.
But until now, Broglio said, he's never publicly shared what he thinks is the key to the story behind his star-crossed arrival in Chicago. He added that plenty of people ask him what happened, but few, if any, ask him why he was involved in what might be the most lopsided trade ever.
* * * * * * *
As a rookie pitcher with the Cardinals in 1959, the Bay Area native and his wife, Barbara, spent nearly $21,000 to buy a house in a residential neighborhood of San Jose, Calif. The next year Broglio won a league-high 21 games, had a 2.74 ERA, finished third in the Cy Young Award voting and doubled his salary to $20,000.
Many families with homes on their street have come and gone in the past 52 years. The Broglios, however, still live in the same house where they raised their four children.
Now a 75-year-old great-grandfather, Broglio has Type 2 diabetes, but he regularly takes long walks, goes golfing and tutors teenage pitchers.
  • Enlarge\l ""
ESPNNow a 75-year-old great-grandfather, Broglio has Type 2 Diabetes, but he regularly golfs and tutors teenage pitchers.The wall of fame in his throwback den flashes back to Broglio on the cover of Sports Illustrated facing Hall of Famer Orlando Cepeda of the Giants and to plaques presented to him for the 1960 season when the young righty was St. Louis' finest. The wall also showcases shots of Hall of Fame legends Bob Gibson, Stan Musial, Sandy Koufax and Lou Brock.
Last week the white-haired and welcoming Broglio adjusted his glasses and drew close to the Brock photo to read aloud for an ESPN camera crew the inscription from the left fielder who was never his teammate. Brock wrote that Broglio was a "hellava (sic) player" and that "history and time have tied us together."
That history goes back to the trade deadline, June 15, 1964. That day began with Brock a Cub and Broglio a Cardinal.
Chicago had a 27-27 record, sufficient for sixth place in the 10-team National League and better than most years in an inglorious era. The perennial second-division team hadn't been to a World Series since 1945.
Things weren't much different at the moment for their archrival Cardinals, who hadn't made it to the Series since winning the championship in '46 and were in eighth place, three games under .500.
The two mediocre ballclubs swapped six players before the deadline, with the Cubs shipping Jack Spring, Paul Toth and Brock to the Cards for Doug Clemens, Bobby Shantz and Broglio.
Brock and Broglio were and remain the significant names.
* * * * * * *
Broglio is up there, or more aptly down there, with Bartman and the Billy Goat in the annals of angst for baseball's longest-suffering franchise. Brock evokes Redbird reverence befitting the National League stolen-base king and 3,000-hit club member.
But when the trade was made, many considered the deal a steal -- for the Cubs. They had essentially exchanged an unproven and defensively challenged outfielder three days short of his 25th birthday for an established 28-year-old pitcher who'd won 18 games the previous season.
"Everybody thought it was a good trade at that time," Hall of Fame Cubs outfielder Billy Williams said last weekend in Cooperstown, where he returns annually for induction festivities. While describing Broglio as a "great pitcher," Williams gestured to demonstrate the precipitous drop of the "12 to 6" curveball he recalls the 6-foot-2 Broglio throwing as a Cardinal.
"Perhaps, at that time, the best curveball in baseball," according to Brock, who also was interviewed in Cooperstown.
"The only track record I had was two left feet," he said.
Hall of Famer Red Schoendienst, a Cardinals coach at the time, said last weekend the St. Louis management asked for his thoughts on Brock before the trade. He said he was impressed with Brock's speed and his potential, but "nobody knew that Lou was going to be good that quick and right off the bat."
Brock, who was concerned he'd be demoted to the minors until the move to St. Louis, said the trade instilled in him a new confidence because "I now had value -- who is that value? Ernie Broglio. What has he done? 20-game winner."
His former team's perspective, Brock said, was easy to understand.
"Broglio could be a starter as well as a long relief man and he had been a winner with the Cardinals, and there was no reason why he should not have been a winner in Chicago."
But Broglio said there was indeed a reason and that the Cubs have never known what he believes motivated the Cardinals to trade him besides the opportunity to get Brock.
"They got a heckuva ballplayer; they gave up damaged goods," Broglio said. "I think that they knew I had a bad arm."
Broglio said he was already over a problem he had experienced two years before, when he had cortisone shots every other start for a troublesome shoulder, but he had hurt his elbow late in '63 and was still suffering as he struggled to a 3-5 record at the time of the trade. He said he received regular treatment for the elbow from the Cardinals' trainer and occasional cortisone shots, too.
  • Enlarge\l ""
Getty ImagesLou Brock hit .297 and stole 888 bases in 16 seasons with the St. Louis Cardinals."I think the Cardinals knew a lot -- a lot more than what I knew of the injury," Broglio said. "So that's why I think they decided that they send the bad arm problem, get rid of him."
Schoendienst said although he knew beforehand of St. Louis's interest in Brock, he wasn't aware of a desire to deal Broglio. "I'm sure the Cardinals didn't make the trade because they thought his arm was bad. I'm sure they didn't."
According to Broglio, there were telling signs in some of his bad performances.
"If I remember right, at one time I threw about four or five wild pitches in one ballgame and Bob Uecker was catching and I kind of jokingly said, 'How come you didn't protect me?' He couldn't. He couldn't have caught the ball or stopped the ball," Broglio said, laughing.
"They were so far in front of home plate that there was an indication that I had problems with my elbow."
The records from '64 reveal that Broglio threw three wild pitches in a game the Cardinals hosted on May 19. Uecker was behind the plate as Broglio also gave up five walks in 6 1/3 innings. The opponent and winner? The Chicago Cubs.
* * * * * * *
Brock said that when he joined the Cardinals, manager Johnny Keane gave him marching, actually speeding, orders and said he needed to become the team's version of the Dodgers' record-setting base stealer, Maury Wills. Although he was skeptical, Brock said he came to consider it the green light that turned his career around.
Thriving immediately for his new team in his new role, Brock batted .348 and stole 33 bases as the catalyst for the surprising world champions of 1964. He spent 16 seasons in St. Louis, surpassed single-season and career stolen-base records set by Wills and Ty Cobb, won another World Series in '67 and a pennant in '68, and earned induction into the Hall of Fame in 1985.
"If he could have stayed with the Chicago Cubs and put those kinds of numbers on the board for the Chicago Cubs, I think you might be seeing we wouldn't have to wait another hundred years to see a World Series," Williams said.
Broglio had just four wins the rest of the '64 season with Chicago, and after his elbow locked up in August, he had surgery in November. Broglio returned to pitching three months later in spring training but allowed more than six runs a game for the Cubs in 1965 and '66. He won three games, lost 12 and never appeared again in the major leagues.
When told of Broglio's assertion that the Cardinals knew they were dealing away damaged goods, Williams said, "That's how the game was played then. Any time a general manager felt he could put stuff on another organization, that's what they did.
  • Enlarge\l ""
AP Photo/Harry L. HallErnie Broglio appeared in just 59 games for the Cubs, posting a 7-19 record and 5.40 ERA."When he came to Chicago, you really knew something happened, you knew something was going on," Williams said. "It probably lost 2 or 3 miles per hour off his fastball; the curveball didn't go down."
"[The Cubs] didn't have a clue about it, and I pitched with pain," Broglio said.
"In those days, you didn't approach the front office, you didn't approach anybody. I didn't want to lose my job."
Cardinals general manager Bing Devine, who engineered the Brock-for-Broglio deal, wasn't with the team to enjoy the first fall fruits of the trade. He was fired that August, before the team surged to the top of the standings, and was later named Executive of the Year by the Sporting News. St. Louis rehired him in 1968, after he had missed both World Series titles achieved with Brock.
Devine died in 2007 and Cardinals trainer Bob Bowman, who treated Broglio, and Cubs general manager John Holland, who traded for him, are also dead.
* * * * * * *
The 1964 surgery to reset Broglio's ulnar nerve left a nine-inch scar on, above and below his elbow that he calls "snake river." And he said there's also numbness to this day in two of his fingers.
Although he laments returning so quickly from the operation and wonders whether his career might have been salvaged if Tommy John surgery had been an option back then, Broglio said he's not bitter about the trade or its enduring burden.
In fact, Broglio reaped a gratifying benefit from being traded for Brock -- a lasting friendship with him. Their most recent get-together was two years ago when Brock, whom Broglio calls a "great individual," invited him to a benefit in St. Louis for his 70th birthday.
"Ernie is top of the charts," Brock said. "He is a good man, a man with integrity. We have a good relationship because we laugh, we talk, and people, for whatever reason, are still interested [in the trade]."
Brock and Broglio were in Chicago for a Cubs old-timers game in 1987 and were introduced to the Wrigley Field crowd. The reaction to the announcement of Broglio's name, he said, was "probably the only standing ovation boos that any athlete would ever get."
But for Brock, whose superb career was emblematic of many a missed Cubs opportunity, the fans stood and were "clapping, hooraying and everything else," Broglio said.
A self-deprecating sense of humor has probably served Broglio well in coming to terms with his unfulfilled pitching promise and his role in the success of others.
"I congratulate all the Hall of Famers," he said. "Some I played ball with, some I helped put there."
William Weinbaum is an "Outside the Lines" producer and worked with Geoff Brown and Jeff Ausiello on this report and the Brock-for-Broglio TV feature scheduled to air on "Baseball Tonight" on Sunday at 12:30 p.m. ET on ESPN2 and 7 p.m. ET on ESPN.
Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 17
Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy