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Atlantis (the History)

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Guardian
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« Reply #15 on: May 10, 2010, 01:24:02 pm »

A Hebrew treatise on computational astronomy dated to AD 1378/79, alludes to the Atlantis myth in a discussion concerning the determination of zero points for the calculation of longitude:

Some say that they [the inhabited regions] begin at the beginning of the western ocean [the Atlantic] and beyond. For in the earliest times [literally: the first days] there was an island in the middle of the ocean. There were scholars there, who isolated themselves in [the pursuit of] philosophy. In their day, that was the [beginning for measuring] the longitudes of the inhabited world. Today, it has become covered by the? sea, and it is ten degrees into the sea; and they reckon the beginning of longitude from the beginning of the western sea.[22]
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Guardian
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« Reply #16 on: May 10, 2010, 01:24:14 pm »

Modern
Francis Bacon's 1627 essay The New Atlantis describes a utopian society that he called Bensalem, located off the western coast of America. A character in the narrative gives a history of Atlantis that is similar to Plato's and places Atlantis in America. It is not clear whether Bacon means North or South America. Isaac Newton's 1728 The Chronology of the Ancient Kingdoms Amended studies a variety of mythological links to Atlantis.[23] In the middle and late 19th century, several renowned Mesoamerican scholars, starting with Charles Etienne Brasseur de Bourbourg, and including Edward Herbert Thompson and Augustus Le Plongeon proposed that Atlantis was somehow related to Mayan and Aztec culture. The 1882 publication of Atlantis: the Antediluvian World by Ignatius L. Donnelly stimulated much popular interest in Atlantis. Donnelly took Plato's account of Atlantis seriously and attempted to establish that all known ancient civilizations were descended from its high Neolithic culture. He also said that Atlantis was technologically advanced, saying that Atlantians invented gunpowder and the compass thousands of years before the rest of the world invented written language.

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Guardian
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« Reply #17 on: May 10, 2010, 01:25:14 pm »

During the late 19th century, ideas about the legendary nature of Atlantis were combined with stories of other lost continents such as Mu and Lemuria. Helena Blavatsky wrote in The Secret Doctrine that the Atlanteans were cultural heroes (contrary to Plato who describes them mainly as a military threat), and are the fourth "Root Race", succeeded by the "Aryan race". Theosophists believe the civilization of Atlantis reached its peak between 1,000,000 and 900,000 years ago but destroyed itself through internal warfare brought about by the inhabitants' dangerous use of magical powers. Rudolf Steiner wrote of the cultural evolution of Atlantis[24] in much the same vein. Edgar Cayce first mentioned Atlantis in 1923,[25] and later suggested that it was originally a continent-sized region extending from the Azores to the Bahamas, holding an ancient, highly evolved civilization which had ships and aircraft powered by a mysterious form of energy crystal. He also predicted that parts of Atlantis would rise in 1968 or 1969. The Bimini Road, a submerged rock formation of large rectangular stones just off North Bimini Island in the Bahamas, was claimed by Robert Ferro and Michael Grumley[26] to be evidence of the lost civilization.

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Guardian
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« Reply #18 on: May 10, 2010, 01:25:34 pm »

According to Herodotus (c. 430 BC), a Phoenician expedition had circumnavigated Africa at the behest of pharaoh Necho, sailing south down the Red Sea and Indian Ocean and northwards in the Atlantic, re-entering the Mediterranean Sea through the Pillars of Hercules. His description of northwest Africa makes it very clear that he located the Pillars of Hercules precisely where they are located today. Nevertheless, a supposed belief that they had been placed at the Strait of Sicily prior to Eratosthenes, has been cited in some Atlantis theories.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantis
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Guardian
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« Reply #19 on: May 10, 2010, 01:26:41 pm »



From Ignatius Donelly's Atlantis: the Antediluvian World, 1882. Image from the Library of Congress, http://lcweb2.loc.gov/cgi-bin/query/D?ils:1:./temp/~pp_aA2u::@@@mdb=fsaall,app,brum,detr,swann,look,gottscho,pan,horyd,genthe,var,cai,cd,hh,yan,bbcards,lomax,ils,prok,brhc,nclc,matpc,iucpub,tgmi

A map showing the supposed extent of the Atlantean Empire. From Ignatius L. Donnelly's Atlantis: the Antediluvian World, 1882.
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Guardian
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« Reply #20 on: May 10, 2010, 01:27:30 pm »



Ignatius L. Donnelly, American congressman, and writer on Atlantis.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlantis
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Sarah
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« Reply #21 on: May 10, 2010, 03:07:56 pm »

Excellent material!
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