Atlantis Arisen
January 16, 2021, 05:42:32 am
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: 'Modern' Behavior Began 40,000 Years Ago In Africa, Evidence Suggests
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/07/980707073901.htm
 
  Home Help Search Arcade Links Staff List Login Register  

The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon/The Legend of Sleepy Hollow

Pages: 1 [2]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: The Sketchbook of Geoffrey Crayon/The Legend of Sleepy Hollow  (Read 510 times)
Deanna Witmer
Atlantean Hero
*****
Posts: 126



View Profile
« Reply #15 on: October 22, 2010, 01:22:31 pm »

POSTSCRIPT

FOUND IN THE HANDWRITING OF MR. KNICKERBOCKER.

THE preceding tale is given almost in the precise words in which I heard it related at a Corporation meeting of the ancient city of Manhattoes, at which were present many of its sagest and most illustrious burghers. The narrator was a pleasant, shabby, gentlemanly old fellow in pepper-and-salt clothes, with a sadly humorous face, and one whom I strongly suspected of being poor, he made such efforts to be entertaining. When his story was concluded there was much laughter and approbation, particularly from two or three deputy aldermen who had been asleep the greater part of the time. There was, however, one tall, dry-looking old gentleman, with beetling eyebrows, who maintained a grave and rather severe face throughout, now and then folding his arms, inclining his head, and looking down upon the floor, as if turning a doubt over in his mind. He was one of your wary men, who never laugh but upon good grounds—when they have reason and the law on their side. When the mirth of the rest of the company had subsided and silence was restored, he leaned one arm on the elbow of his chair, and sticking the other akimbo, demanded, with a slight but exceedingly sage motion of the head and contraction of the brow, what was the moral of the story and what it went to prove.

The story-teller, who was just putting a glass of wine to his lips as a refreshment after his toils, paused for a moment, looked at his inquirer with an air of infinite deference, and, lowering the glass slowly to the table, observed that the story was intended most logically to prove—

"That there is no situation in life but has its advantages and pleasures—provided we will but take a joke as we find it;

"That, therefore, he that runs races with goblin troopers is likely to have rough riding of it.

"Ergo, for a country schoolmaster to be refused the hand of a Dutch heiress is a certain step to high preferment in the state."

The cautious old gentleman knit his brows tenfold closer after this explanation, being sorely puzzled by the ratiocination of the syllogism, while methought the one in pepper-and-salt eyed him with something of a triumphant leer. At length he observed that all this was very well, but still he thought the story a little on the extravagant—there were one or two points on which he had his doubts.

"Faith, sir," replied the story-teller, "as to that matter, I don't believe one-half of it myself."

D. K.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

[1] The whip-poor-will is a bird which is only heard at night. It receives its name from its note, which is thought to resemble those words.

Retrieved from "http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/The_Sketchbook_of_Geoffrey_Crayon/The_Legend_of_Sleepy_Hollow"
Report Spam   Logged
Pages: 1 [2]   Go Up
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Bookmark this site! | Upgrade This Forum
SMF For Free - Create your own Forum

Powered by SMF | SMF © 2016, Simple Machines
Privacy Policy